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Relations with Germany matter for a healthy Idaho future – by Ricklef Beutin and Steven E Sokol

Idaho’s relationship with Germany began when Germans first arrived to the Idaho Territory as miners, assayers, farmers, brewers and bakers in the 1860s. Thereafter, German immigrants continued to settle in Idaho, bringing with them brass bands, Oktoberfest and the Feast of St. Nicholas. These traditions endure. It is estimated that one-fifth of all Idahoans have German ancestry, making them the state’s second-largest ethnic group. Thus, it stands to reason that town hall meetings to discuss the significance and future of this critical transatlantic relationship have landed in Boise. Today, Germany and the United States maintain a range of partnerships in all areas of society — business and industry, foreign and defense policy, science and academia. Much of the cooperation occurs with little fanfare or visibility...

Germany is a key ally of and partner to Tennessee | Opinion

For many years Germany has been an important trading partner for the state of Tennessee and the largest European investor. (Photo: Larry McCormack / tennessean) STORY HIGHLIGHTS Matthias Heider is chair of the Germany-USA Parliamentary Friendship Group in the German Bundestag. Bob Clement is a former U.S. representative from Tennessee, serving 1988 to 2003. Steven E. Sokol is president of the American Council on Germany. Peter Weichlein is CEO of the United States Association of Former Members of Congress. Founded in 1980, last year’s 39th Oktoberfest welcomed a quarter of a million people to Nashville to enjoy German bratwurst and beer and to celebrate German culture, music, and traditions. Since more than 45 million Americans can claim German ancestry, it’s not surprising that so many Tennesseans...

Deutschland macht sich klein. Das muss aufhören! by ACG President Dr. Steven E. Sokol

Die deutsch-amerikanischen Beziehungen verändern sich mit ungeahnter Geschwindigkeit. Das mag viele zutiefst besorgen. Doch dieser Umbruch bietet die Möglichkeit zur Neugestaltung – und kann das transatlantische Verhältnis auf ein neues Niveau heben. Gerade heute, da unsicher erscheint, welchen Weg die USA einschlagen, ist in besonderer Weise Deutschland gefordert. Wie ein roter Faden zog sich diese Erkenntnis durch die 40. Young-Leaders-Konferenz des American Council on Germany. Mehrere Tage lang diskutierten in Berlin junge Amerikaner und Deutsche über den Stand der transatlantischen Beziehungen. Eines schien am Ende sicher: So wie bisher wird es nicht weitergehen. Eine Umfrage unter den Teilnehmern wies dabei auf einen Knackpunkt im Verhältnis hin: 60 Prozent der Amerikaner sowie 68 Prozent der Deutschen finden, dass gemeinsame Werte wie Demokratie, Rechtsstaatlichkeit und Meinungsfreiheit nach wie vor...

The Transatlantic Relationship – Past and Present… By Dr. Steven E. Sokol

So far this summer, there has been no “Sommerloch” (a break in the pace of current events), and with the NATO Summit this week and the meeting between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin just a few days later, there is no indication that things will slow down anytime soon. Chancellor Angela Merkel has been vocal in her desire to stave off a trade war between Europe and the United States. In light of the Trump administration’s tariffs on European steel and aluminum imports and current consideration of additional tariffs on automobiles, trucks, and automotive parts – which could be painful for Germany’s major car companies – the Chancellor told the German parliament that “it is worth every effort to try to defuse this conflict so...

America and Germany are about so much more than Trump – Denis McDonough, Steven E. Sokol, David Deissner

If the American-German relationship can survive US President Donald Trump's term, it'll be stronger than ever, write three policy experts for Handelsblatt. The Paris Climate Accord. Steel and aluminum tariffs. The Iran Deal. It is hard to imagine a rougher patch in transatlantic and US-German relations. Earlier this month, when we participated in a conference with German and American opinion leaders who had gathered in Washington, DC to assess the relationship and determine concrete actions that will drive the alliance forward, the mood of our German friends reflected this rough patch. There was great pessimism about how much progress can be achieved in shoring up the relationship given the current environment. Read more
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